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Interactive Kiosk

NOTE: These instructions were last updated on 3/17 with final details on A5 deliverables.

Design is ultimately about creating experiences for people. When considering solutions to common, albeit complex socio-technical problems, designers must give special attention to the interplay of the social and physical context, information, and user behavior. The goal of this team-based assignment is to envision and build an interactive, intelligent, and innovative Point of Purchase (POP) Kiosk that supports the goals and context of the design brief summarized below. Teams should strive to introduce a concept that’s unique for the marketplace, feasible, and desirable for the target context and group that is articulated by each team as they work to address the design brief.

Teams will be comprised of ~4 people assigned by instructors, contained within each section to best utilize weekly studio meeting times.

Learning Goals 
  • Doing online research to understand a problem
  • Conducting semi-structure interviews
  • Cultivating empathy toward users and creating personas
  • Creating storyboards
  • Framing a problem based on user research
  • Ideating and refining concepts
  • Sketching and making physical prototypes
  • Testing prototypes with users 
  • Understanding how sensors/hardware and displays can integrate into a user experience
  • Understanding how devices interact with physical products or product markers
  • Creating a moodboard and color scheme
  • Developing and implementing a design language for multiple screens/artifacts
  • Creating digital screen designs and clickable prototypes to demonstrate key interactions
  • Communicating design ideas to others


Design brief

There is significant potential for self-service and partially automated point of purchase (POP) systems to be increasingly integrated into the typical brick-and-mortar shopping experience. While they have become commonplace staples of supermarkets and big-box retailers, there are undoubtedly many ways that such systems can innovate and reshape the customer experience across a variety of retail sectors. As such, these systems will be expected to support a wide range of both human and retail needs and services.

A kiosk that represents a new evolutionary step in this problem space should address the current limitations and frustrations that many customers encounter, while also leveraging already established procedures and proven solutions. A device that is intuitive, consistent, and reliable—as well as thoughtful and delightful in its implementation—is the design goal that is being targeted. Rather than a general purpose or one-size-fits-all approach that is aimed at being utilized across a breadth of contexts, you are instead tasked on focusing in on a specific retail space that has needs and constraints that can push you to be creative. The kiosks you design should address the following:
  1. Context: While the primary design goal of a POP kiosk is shared by all teams, within that constraint you are free to pursue whatever retail space you choose: well-known chains; boutique or artisanal products or services; emerging and novel marketplaces; or even near-future retail spaces that are on the verge of being possible. Each context, product, customer, and type of purchase will present unique challenges and opportunities to demonstrate your ability to innovate and generate solutions.
  2. Product Interaction: It is expected that each kiosk will be specifically designed around interactions with either physical product(s) or a marker that symbolizes said product(s). This will necessitate that your design solution is taking this very specific type of interaction into account, and that this is well-represented and thoughtfully integrated into your solution.
  3. Synthesis: Your kiosk itself will ultimately represent a synthesis of everything you have learned thus far about visual communication, material prototyping, and physical/+digital interaction. The design and integration of these areas should reflect the contexts and people for which the kiosk will be deployed and must include the following elements:
    • A physical chassis constructed out of appropriate materials
    • A digital screen that displays pertinent information and feedback
    • At least one physical interaction of a mechanical nature (e.g. buttons)
    • A means of interacting with a physical product (e.g. sensor, scanner, camera)
    • A means of accepting multiple common types of payment
Technology considerations
Teams must demonstrate their ability to design a preferred future based on the technology of today and the near future. The design should consider the rich set of possible sensors and capabilities of today’s smartphones and wearables. However, teams may also envision new capabilities as long as they are reasonable and grounded in current cutting-edge technology. Existing capabilities include, but are not limited to:
  • Location sensing via GPS
  • Movement via accelerometers to sense repetitive activities such as walking, running, biking, etc.
  • Sound via a microphone for ambient audio and voice
  • Cameras (still and video)
  • Light sensors
  • Speakers, vibration, and LED lighting on screen for feedback and feedforward
  • Object and face recognition
  • Biometrics such as fingerprint reader
  • Connectivity to internet using Bluetooth, wifi, and mobile network
  • Device to device communication via NFC (near field communication) either with touch or very close proximity (http://www.nearfieldcommunication.org/)

What to do:

Your team's goal is to perform human-centered research and design around the brief outlined above. This assignment has two phases. For phase 1 (Research), teams will conduct online research, competitive analysis,  and fieldwork to more deeply understand one of the given design briefs. Teams will create personas to articulate stakeholder concerns. Finally, your teams will generate storyboards to articulate hypotheses about the problems and potential solutions, and then conduct interviews with stakeholders to sharpen your point of focus. For phase 2 (Conceptualization and Execution), teams will iterate on physical prototypes, create interactive screen designs, conduct user testing, create moodboards, and develop a design language specification. Teams will also be expected to create a slide deck, and poster as part of their final deliverables. 

Phase 1: Research and Conceptualization (see list of deliverables and due dates below)
  1. Online research. Get to know your particular topic inside and out. Read all the information that you can find online and summarize the specific challenges. Write a list of all resources (books, URLs, journals, conference papers) so that you can cite them later. Create a list of existing POP kiosks that you find and summarize what they offer and what they lack (competitive analysis). 
  2. Personas. Based on the design brief, online research, and any other research you conduce (informal interview or informal field observations) create a personas that illustrate the archetype primary stakeholder (main user completing the POP interaction) in your problem context. Minimum 1 persona per team member.
  3. Storyboards. Write at least two "speed dating" scenarios that describe problematic situations for your stakeholders and illustrate these as storyboards. Each storyboard should include a title that summarize the problem and four frames that clearly communicate 1) the context (setting, stakeholders, etc.), 2) the problem, 3) the proposed solution, and 4) a resolution. Teams will share storyboards in class and get feedback on how effectively they communicate the issues and concepts.
  4. Wireframes. Utilize hands-drawn (low-fidelity) and/or digital (mid-fidelity) wireframe concepts to clearly communicate the content and interactive elements of screens/information displays that will be part of the user interface for your kiosk. Wireframes should be completed individually as per in-class instructions/scheduled, but should also serve as coordinating and shared design artifacts to help articulate and refine the interactive/informational elements of your screen(s).
  5. Kiosk sketches. Taking everything into account that you have learned and developed up to this point, you should start sketching ideas for the physical kiosk itself. This is an activity that will be revisited several times throughout the process. Sketches will be completed individually and as a team, and will take the form of thumbnails, full-page, and digital forms.
  6. Materials list. Teams should create and update/maintain a shared list of the prototyping materials they will need for low, mid, and high fidelity prototypes of their kiosk. Teams should begin gathering materials by the end of Week 7 so that they can begin working on physical prototypes of the Kiosk by Week 8.
  7. Paper prototype. Create initial mockups out of paper to demonstrate how users will interact with screens/information displays to complete the purchase process for the physical product your kiosk is designed for. 
    • Do initial testing with peers from class/section
    • Conduct testing with a minimum of two potential stakeholders/users from outside of class.
      • These tests should be carried out by team members in pairs, with one member focusing on guiding the testing session, while the other team member assists with "operating" the prototype and taking notes about the testing session—this is very important!
      • Make sure you collaboratively create a set of specific tasks (e.g. such as those you drafted for A4) that you are asking your user to complete through interaction with your prototype.
      • It is recommended that your prototype and tasks focus on specific, but fairly high-level interactions that will get you the most salient and valuable feedback about your initial ideas concerning how a user will interact with the screen(s) of your kiosk when completing a purchase or other specific interaction.
      • It is ok to also share sketches, wireframes, and storyboards with your users to get additional feedback, but this should likely be done after the paper prototype testing has been done.
      • Share the results of your tests with the team, and then as a group you should summarize the results of these tests, highlighting the key findings and discussing their implications for your design direction moving forward.
  8. Interviews and concept validation. After a round of iteration on the storyboards, wireframes, and paper prototypes, teams should interview potential stakeholders to better understand the real problems and to clarify the direction for your design concept.
    • Make sure to read Erika Hall on Interviewing Humans!
    • Reach out to your own social networks and people who fit your personas to find potential interviewees. The closer you can get to a real user of your shopping context, the better. You might interview a friend or family member, but the key goal here is to get *real* feedback and insight into both the general shopping experiences of potential users, as well as those specific to your design.
    • As a team, create a rough interview guide with open-ended questions for your intended stakeholders. This should include general questions about the interviewee’s activities related to the topic and specific questions tied to your storyboards. 
    • Each student on the team should conduct at least one interview with a stakeholder. Bring your sketches, storyboards, wireframes (and if appropriate, your paper prototype) to the interviews to get elicit from your potential users.
    • Make sure you share your interview findings with your teammates. As a team, summarize the key insights you've learned about the problem and the stakeholders.
    • NOTE: you can utilize the same people for interviews and paper prototype testing, but they should be conducted as separate activities, even if they occur back-to-back. Do not attempt to do both at the same time. This does not mean that team members can interview the same person more than once, as you still need a total of 4 unique interviews.
Timeline & Deliverable Due Dates for Phase 1:
Note that some of these stages are expected to continue to be iterated on beyond their initial deliverable due dates (sketches, wireframes, paper prototypes, etc.), and that these deadlines and submissions are meant to serve as forcing functions and checkpoints to ensure progress is being made.
  • Online research: Starts 2/12 and continues through 2/22
  • Personas: completed by 2/15
  • Storyboards:
    • "Speed dating" storyboards completed by 2/15
    • Storyboard iterations completed and submitted by 2/21
  • Initial Wireframes: completed individually by 2/21, then continued to be iterated on and refined/revised
  • Kiosk sketches:
    • Initial sketch, 1 per team member completed by 2/19
    • Thumbnail sketch iterations, 10 per team member (can have more than one on a page, and should build on your initial sketches to explore possible variations and directions) completed by 2/21
    • Revised mid-fidelity sketch (can be digital), 1 per team member completed by 2/26
  • Materials list: completed by 2/26 (will likely be updated)
  • Initial Paper prototype: completed by 2/22 and tested by 2/26
  • Interviews: conducted and summarized by 2/26
  • Phase 1 group report due 2/26 submitted via Canvas before 11:59pm that includes:
    • Online research summary (including sources)
    • Minimum of 1 persona per team member
    • All storyboards and wireframes up to this point
    • All kiosk sketches (as noted above)
    • Materials list (understood to be a work in progress)
    • Paper prototypes including:
      • multiple images of the completed paper prototypes you tested
      • a summary (about a page per test) of your findings from your initial round of testing, including a list of the specific tasks you asked users to complete
    • Team interview guide + summary of interview results—this summary can be a synthesis of all 4 interviews, and should likely be ~2 pages in length, which can include some bullet points.

Phase 2: Iteration and Realization
Please ensure that you retain any and all work (sketches, wireframes, personas, photos, paper prototypes, etc). that you produced in Phase 1, as well as all Phase 2 deliverables, so that you can easily include selected items in your final report.

NOTE: it is expected that, concurrent to the deliverables below, you will be continuously working on developing, building, and testing the physical kiosk itself—even if this is not explicitly stated for all deliverables and due dates.
    1. Low fidelity physical kiosk + paper prototype screens. This deliverable will act as an intermediate step as you work towards what will become your mid and high(er) fidelity kiosk (items 6 and 7 below). This version will also need to be ready to be presented (via photos and other supporting materials) for an interim crit on 3/7. The primary goal at this point is to start bringing what you have been testing in terms of user flows, scenarios, and tasks through your wireframes and paper prototypes, and joining that with an actual physical chassis for your kiosk. Your initial chassis will likely be constructed of cardboard (or a similar material) and might incorporate existing or re-worked versions of your paper prototypes for the screens at first, so that you can test your design as it progresses over weeks 8 and 9. Key dates and milestones for the progression of your kiosk will be announced in the schedule/slides/Canvas to ensure you are staying on track. To minimize the amount of transport of your entire physical kiosk, you are encouraged to work modularly wherever and whenever possible—which might allow for you to do work on the physical kiosk during class/studio meetings. There will only be two times during the quarter (final crit and final showcase) where you absolutely must have your entire physical kiosk design in class.
      • This prototype should necessarily represent a first pass at translating the design your team decided on through the iterative sketching process in Phase 1, into material reality. This is where you begin to have you kiosk take shape, and will begin to gain a better understanding of constraints related to size, materials, interaction with physical products, screen size and position, etc.
      • You should leverage all of your materials up to this point, especially your paper prototype testing results, interview data, online research, and design spec.
      • Bear in mind that your physical kiosk prototype *must* accommodate and utilize an actual digital screen for information displays and interactive screen elements. You should design even your early prototype iterations with this constraint in mind.
      • You need to work quickly to start bringing elements together in order to test the physical aspects of your kiosk in conjunction with your screen designs. You must do at least some testing with a physical kiosk + paper prototypes for the screens to work out any problems early on before moving on to higher fidelity solutions. You can utilize any of the previously utilized techniques for testing in this area, and each group needs to decide on the right kind and number of tests to run—and be prepared to justify your process and results in your final report.
    2. Design specification. Groups should construct a basic design specification document that covers the various pertinent and relevant aspects of their designs as they relate to requirements, constraints, and considerations. This is your chance to clearly and concisely communicate these important factors about your kiosk, its intended context of deployment, and the key issues and design goals that must be met as a function of how you have conceived of your design. Students should use the template spreadsheet provided, and edit the 'aspects' as they see fit for their particular project. This spreadsheet should then be translated into a document that lists each aspect along with their respective requirement, constraint, and consideration components in a clear and easy to understand manner. See the two examples at the end of this document for scaffolding/examples of the type of document you should produce (adjusting formatting and content as needed for your spec, as these are not perfect—but do offer a useful guide).
    3. Moodboard. Drawing inspiration from your user research and personas, create a list of adjectives that captures the essence of the emotional experience you want to create with your design ideas. Then, using this list of words, create a moodboard as a collage of images that have a consistent mood and feeling with a relatively small set of colors. The moodboard will be used to select colors, typefaces, and design elements for your design language specification. This should be constructed collaboratively, with input from all members of the team.
    4. Design Language/Style Guide. Based on your moodboard, create a design language specification that shows your team's choices for colors, typefaces, and design elements (see examples herehere, and here to scaffold/model your own work after—many more can be found online). Your design language should specify how to indicate a visual hierarchy across digital and physical media: your kiosk chassis, screen designs, slides, and poster, respectively. Your style guide should be thoughtfully organized and presented and should include (but is not limited to) the following:
        • Logo (suggested, but optional)
        • Color pallet (primary and secondary)
        • Typefaces (names and examples)
        • Typography: Sizes and typefaces for different text elements
        • Common user interface elements (doesn't need to be exhaustive, just illustrative examples)
        • Other visual elements
    5. Screen designs and 'interactive' prototypeUsing your team’s design language, create a click-through demo showing high fidelity digital screens that illustrate the key interactions for the main use cases/scenarios your team has identified in the research and conceptualization phase. The screen designs might be produced and tested as a slide deck (WoZ style) or might be imported into an online screen prototype tool (e.g., InVision, MarvelApp, etc.) so that people can try a click-through demo. Your team should decide what is best for you based on your constraints and goals.
      • User testing. Test your 'clickable' prototype with at least 3 users by creating a list of tasks for users to complete and a list of interview questions about their thoughts on and experience with the prototype. As a deliverable, your team will turn in:
        • A document with your list of tasks (at least 2 tasks) and interview questions (at least 5 questions)
        • Based on input from your testers, create a short document (about 1 page long) with a list of of design considerations/improvements/changes for the next iteration (bullet-point format is acceptable). Your summary should also facilitate you being able to talk about what changes you implemented and what the result of those changes was (from an evaluation standpoint) in your final report.
    6. Integrated "mid fidelity" physical prototype of kiosk. This version of your kiosk is the "putting it all together" step in the process. This is the kiosk that will be demoed and critiqued in section on 3/15, and should be as fully-realized as possible up to that point. You should take "mid fidelity" to mean that there is still possible room for improvement in the final craft and presentation of your design, but that it is still a fully-realized working prototype, made of the materials your team has chosen, and that has integrated your high fidelity digital screens. It is expected that your team will continue to test, iterate, refine and improve the design through the final showcase on 3/19. This version should effectively demonstrate the typical "shopping experience" (from the moment a user approaches the kiosk, until they complete their purchase, and leave with their product) as you have envisioned and realized it through your design. This prototype should include:
      • A physical chassis constructed out of appropriate materials and with an appropriate level of craft and polish such that it approximates what a fully realized version of your kiosk might look like (should be nearing final product).
      • A digital screen that displays pertinent information and feedback to complete the major tasks, scenarios, and application flow that are a part of completing a purchase through your kiosk (based on all work completed up to this point, and in particular the work carried out in step 5 of Phase 2 above).
      • At least one physical interaction of a mechanical nature (e.g. buttons)
      • A means of interaction with a physical product or physical product marker (e.g. sensor, scanner, camera)
      • A means of accepting common types of payment (cash, card, ApplePay, etc.)
    7. Finalized kiosk. Taking everything you have learned from user testing, the interim and final crit, as well as any additional feedback you receive from instructors and peers—you should complete work on the final iteration of your kiosk for the final showcase and demo. This is also the version that will be what is captured and represented in your final report.
    8. Final slide deck. Create a slide deck (designed using your team's design language) that will serve as an overview of your design problem, key user insights, the motivation behind your solution, and how your kiosk was designed to solve the problem/design opportunity your team identified. You can think of this slide deck as somewhere between a summary of the project and "marketing material" that supplements the demo of your actual kiosk. This slide deck will need to be displayed at both the final crit as well as at the final showcase on either a tablet (preferred) or a laptop provided by your team. It's recommended that your slide deck include the following: 
      • A title page with your team name, date, team members and emails.
      • A slide to introduce the challenge/design problem space.
      • 1-2 slides on your personas/intended users.
      • A slide on your team’s "mission statement" and motivation behind your solution
      • 2-3 slides on your novel kiosk concept that introduces the typical use-case scenario, and that demonstrate how your solution addresses the design challenge you identifies.
      • A conclusion slide with key insights and lessons learned
      • As an "appendix" 2-3 slides showing your team’s moodboard, design language, and design specifications (and any other supporting material you feel is appropriate).
      • A  slide with contact information and acknowledgements.
    9. Project poster. Create a poster with vertical layout at a size of 11" x 17" designed using your team's design language. The poster should serve as "marketing material" for your kiosk that serves to "sell" the idea to a potential investor or client. Think of it as something that might be displayed at a trade show or some other marketing event or convention. You should definitely leverage lessons learned from A2 when designing and laying out your poster, and it should be presented in such a way that it is clear to the viewer what the kiosk is, the retail context it addresses, why and how it is innovative, and why they should/would want to install it in their retail space.
    Note: when designing the screens, slides, and poster, make certain that you are leveraging lessons, techniques, and best practices you learned from completing A1 and A2.

    Timeline & Due Dates Phase 2:
    • Low fidelity physical kiosk + paper prototype screens: Begins 2/26 and is ongoing through the interim crit that will take place on 3/7. You *must* have built, iterate on, and tested this iteration of the kiosk by then, as you will need to provide photographs of the kiosk and other supporting materials on that date for the crit.
    • Design specification: completed and submitted by 3/1
    • Moodboard: completed and submitted by 3/1
    • Design Language/Style Guide: first draft due and submitted 3/1, final draft completed by 3/3
    • Screen designs and 'interactive' prototype: completed by *no later than but preferably before* 3/12
    • Integrated mid fidelity physical prototype of kiosk: completed by 3/15 for final crit in studio section (must bring iterations of physical kiosk, slides, and poster).
    • Finalized kiosk,final slide deck, project poster: completed by 3/19 for final showcase/demo
    Helpful Materials/Tools for this Assignment
    Final Deliverables
    • For the final showcase/demo on Tuesday, 3/19:
      • Physical Kiosk Design that satisfies all design consideration in the design brief and other instructions
      • A slide deck that accompanies your physical prototype for the final crit and showcase
      • A  poster (dimensions 11 x 17) that serves as "Marketing Material" for your kiosk
    • For online submission via Canvas on Monday, 3/18 before 11:59pm:
      • NOTE: you will submit three (3) separate PDF files per group: report, poster, slides. These should *not* be combined into a single PDF, but should be uploaded as separate attachments to your final A5 group submission.
      • A PDF of your final poster
      • A PDF of your final slide deck
      • A final PDF report detailing your groups entire design project (remember to *show* intentionality wherever possible) that includes the following in this recommended order:
    A note about page lengths: spacing is assumed to be double spaced, with "~1 page" taking into consideration that it will vary from half a page to something slightly longer than a page. Use your best judgement in ensuring that what you submit provides sufficient detail and insight for a given deliverable.
      • Title page including: kiosk/product name, group number, names of all group members
      • Table of contents with appropriate sections and page numbers
      • ~1 page introduction to project including context, motivation/design problem, your proposed solution, etc.
      • A page with a clear photo showing your final kiosk to set the stage for what comes next...
      • ~1 page summary of initial online (or other) research, including  what you learned from it and your resulting problem/opportunity statement that your design addressed
      • Minimum of your two best/most representative personas
      • Minimum of your two best/most representative storyboards
      • Your groups best (you choose) full set of sketches: initial, thumbnails, final/refined -- it is suggested you choose the one that most closely resembles the final design direction your team took
      • Paper prototype, laid out in logical order for a minimum of one representative complete workflow (you can lay it out on a table and take photos or do scans and combine them as you see fit). Include arrows or other annotations to show the intended flow.
      • ~1 page summary of what you learned, insights gained, or key takeaways from paper prototype testing
      • You groups interview guide you created
      • ~1 page summary of key insights and actionable data gathered from your interviews
      • Wireframes: 1 complete workflow from start to finish (can include multiple screens per page as long as they are legible), indicating the flow with arrows/captions—highly suggested you pick a set of wireframes that is representative of a task/user scenario that was then translated into a high fidelity set of screens
      • High fidelity screens and clickable prototype: 1 complete and representative workflow from start to finish (can include multiple screens per page as long as they are legible), indicating the flow with arrows/captions. best if you can show progression from wireframes to this iteration.
        • Include a link to your clickable prototype if possible
      • ~1 page summary of what you learned, insights gained, or key takeaways from clickable prototype testing
      • Moodboard
      • Style guide
      • ~1 page summary of your final crit (from 3/15) insights, actionable changes, intentional improvements to be made, etc. and supporting photos of your kiosk for comparison to what is demoed at final showcase.
      • Copies of the feedback forms filled out for/by you at the final crit on 3/15
      • Presentation of final kiosk with representative photos (minimum 2 of the entire kiosk from different angles and minimum of 2 showing close-ups of key elements you want to highlight), include very brief descriptions and annotations/captions highlighting features and functions.
      • ~1 to 2 page conclusion that contains a discussion of the challenges your team faced, improvements you would make to your final iteration for the purposes of this assignment, some discussion of possible next steps for the next iteration/version of the kiosk if you were continuing the project, and a final reflection.
      • Appendix: we will provide you with a link to a shared Google Drive folder (in the Canvas submission area), labeled by group number, that can serve as an "appendix" where your team can upload any/all supporting process artifacts you created throughout the course of the project that are not included above.
    • Completion of a team/project evaluation questionnaire (Google Form) that will be taken into consideration when calculating individual final grades for the project.

    Grading Rubric
    Grades will be based on the following:
    Note: percentages shown are rough (but realistic) estimates and may vary depending on context of the specific project

    Phase 1 (30%)
    • Online research + Personas (5%)
      • Did the team effectively search about the problem space and other related information? 
      • Did the team adequately and clearly summarize their findings?
      • Are the personas informed by preliminary research?
      • Do the personas clearly communicate the primary and secondary stakeholder goals, needs and desires?
      • Is there a minimum of 1 persona per team member?
    • Storyboards + Wireframes (5%)
      • Do the storyboards clearly communicate the context, problem, solution, and resolution for each scenario?
      • Are the storyboard iterations more polished and detailed, building on your "speed dating" storyboards?
      • Did each team member create a minimum of 1 storyboard?
      • Do wireframe concepts clearly communicate the content and interactive elements of screens/information displays?
      • Do wireframes help clearly communicate initial ideas for the workflow of scenarios and use cases?
    • Paper prototype (10%) 
      • Do paper prototypes demonstrate how users will interact with screens/information displays to complete the purchase process for the physical product your kiosk is designed for?
      • Are paper prototypes interactive and constructed in such a way that they facilitate user testing?
      • Did teams conduct testing with a minimum of two potential stakeholders/users from outside of class?
        • Did teams clearly articulate a set of tasks to be tested?
        • Did teams effectively summarize results of those tests?
    • Interviews and concept validation (10%)
      • Did teams create an effective interview guide with open-ended questions for intended stakeholders?
      • Did each team member conduct at least one interview with a stakeholder? 
      • Did teams effectively summarize the key insights learned about the problem and the stakeholders?
    Phase 2 (70%)
    • Low fidelity physical kiosk + paper prototype screens (10%). 
      • Does this prototype represent an effective first pass at translating existing design materials from Phase 1 into material reality?
      • Does the physical kiosk thoughtfully allow for the integration of a working digital screen?
      • Is there a clear indication of integration between the physical kiosk and paper (or digital) screens?
      • Did teams produce/provide the required materials and participate in the interim crit?
    • Moodboard + Style Guide (5%)
      • Did teams effectively create a moodboard consisting of a collage of images that have a consistent mood and feeling with a relatively small set of colors?
      • Does the teams style guide present a clear and consistent design language?
      • Is the style guide  thoughtfully organized and presented and include (at a minimum) the following:
        • Logo (suggested, but optional)
        • Color pallet (primary and secondary)
        • Typefaces (names and examples)
        • Typography: Sizes and typefaces for different text elements
        • Common user interface elements
    • Screen designs and 'interactive' prototype (10%)
      • Does the interactive screen prototype effectively use your team’s design language to create high fidelity screens?
      • Did the team create a click-through demo that illustrates the key interactions for the main use cases/scenarios? 
      • Did the team test their 'clickable' prototype with at least 3 users?  
      • Did teams create a document with your list of tasks (at least 2 tasks) and interview questions (at least 5 questions)
      • Did teams create a short document (about 1 page long) with a list of of design considerations/improvements/changes for the next iteration?
    • Integrated "mid fidelity" physical prototype of kiosk (10%)
      • Did teams effectively produce a fully-realized working prototype, made of the materials your team has chosen, and that has integrated your high fidelity digital screens?
      • Does this prototype show evidence of building on and incorporating lessons learned from earlier deliverables?
      • Does the prototype satisfy the constraints of the design brief?
      • Does the prototype effectively communicate and allow the user to walk through completing a purchase within the intended context of the kiosks deployment?
      • Did teams actively participate in the interim crit on 3/15?
    • Finalized kiosk (15%)
      • The final kiosk will be graded according to the following:
        • Satisfies all requirements outlined in the design brief and is a fully-realized solution
        • Has a physical chassis constructed out of appropriate materials with an appropriate level of finish and craft
        • Has a digital screen that effectively displays pertinent information and feedback for completing (at least one) purchase/transaction scenario/workflow
        • Screens have consistent and appropriate visual design, navigation, and hierarchy?
        • At least one physical interaction of a mechanical nature (e.g. buttons)
        • A thoughtful means of interacting with a physical product or product marker (e.g. sensor, scanner, camera)
        • A means of accepting multiple common types of payment
        • Adheres to the style guide (screens, physical chassis)
        • Effectively and compellingly addresses the specific design goal/problem as articulated by the team?
        • Does the final design demonstrate an innovative solution to a problem?
        • Does the final kiosk demonstrate design with intentionality?
    • Final slide deck (5%)
      • Does the slide deck adhere to the style guide? 
      • Does the slide deck serve as an overview of your design and include (approximately) the following?: 
        • A title page with your team name, date, team members and emails.
        • A slide to introduce the challenge/design problem space.
        • 1-2 slides on your personas/intended users.
        • A slide on your team’s "mission statement" and motivation behind your solution
        • 2-3 slides on your novel kiosk concept that introduces the typical use-case scenario, and that demonstrate how your solution addresses the design challenge you identifies.
        • A conclusion slide with key insights and lessons learned
        • As an "appendix" 2-3 slides showing your team’s moodboard, design language, and design specifications (and any other supporting material you feel is appropriate).
        • A  slide with contact information and acknowledgements.
    • Project poster (5%)
      • Does the poster make use of hierarchy, image, and grid?
      • Does the poster clearly communicate the context and goals of the design?
      • Does the poster use the design language specification consistently?
      • Does the poster have visual appeal and does it communicate information clearly?
      • Does the poster serve as effective 'marketing material' for the kiosk?
    • Final Report (10%)
      • Completeness of report (see required sections/materials to be included above)
      • Clarity and structure of report
      • Effective representation of the entirety of the project
      • Effective communication of designing with intentionality